Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award

Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award

About the Award

The Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award was established by the Richard K. Lubin Family foundation in partnership with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The program supports early career physician-scientists in the greater Boston area as they launch their research careers. Lubin Scholars receive a four-year financial award of $150,000 per year and work under the tutelage of a Lubin Scholar Mentor to help guide them during this pivotal time in their early career. Up to four Lubin Scholars are selected annually. The purpose of the program is to help retain the brightest physician-scientists in academic research, through a combination of enhanced mentoring and financial support.

William G. Kaelin Jr., MD, a 2019 Nobel Prize recipient and Dana-Farber researcher, serves as the Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award Scientific Director. Candidates are invited to apply from Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center institutions (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Many studies have shown that physician-scientists leave academic research early in their careers for a number of reasons, including financial limitations and more opportunities in the private sector. Surmounting these formidable barriers to retention in academic research is critical to the future of Dana-Farber’s research enterprise and to the broader community of academic medical centers. The Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award is intended to create new avenues for early career physician-scientists to reach professional and financial stability within the field of academic research.

“We are deeply grateful to the Lubin family for their continued partnership with Dana-Farber, especially for their generous support of our world-class faculty. The innovative Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award sets an inspiring example for how we encourage physician-scientists and early career investigators to continue their promising research—by providing them with crucial mentoring and financial resources at a pivotal stage in their careers. These prestigious awards will not only help scientists in the field today, but also create a pipeline and support system for future talent who will someday drive the next major breakthroughs and change the landscape of cancer care as we know it,” said Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, President and CEO of Dana-Farber and the Richard and Susan Smith Professor of Medicine.

Lubin Scholars are among the most promising early career investigators who are pursuing cancer-relevant basic or translational laboratory-based research and who have demonstrated potential to become the next generation of leaders in cancer research. The selection of Lubin Scholars focuses primarily on those working in fundamental science because many of today’s most important advances in cancer can trace their origins back to research of the basic principles of biology and chemistry.

“I have tremendous admiration for Dana-Farber and respect for its commitment to training the future leaders who will shape the field of oncology. I am pleased that our Foundation has been able to work with the Institute to bring to fruition an award that will help the next generations of scientists succeed in their academic research careers,” said Richard Lubin.

“I know from experience that mentoring colleagues early in their careers has a positive impact on scientific research. Certainly, mentorship combined with a financial award will be incredibly beneficial to young scientists, and these new awards will assure that early career researchers can remain focused on their science and scientific training during their critical transition to independence,” said Kaelin. “I am grateful to the Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation for its vision and commitment in establishing these important and innovative awards.”

Lubin Scholars and Mentors

About the Award

The Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award was established by the Richard K. Lubin Family foundation in partnership with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The program supports early career physician-scientists in the greater Boston area as they launch their research careers. Lubin Scholars receive a four-year financial award of $150,000 per year and work under the tutelage of a Lubin Scholar Mentor to help guide them during this pivotal time in their early career. Up to four Lubin Scholars are selected annually. The purpose of the program is to help retain the brightest physician-scientists in academic research, through a combination of enhanced mentoring and financial support.

William G. Kaelin Jr., MD, a 2019 Nobel Prize recipient and Dana-Farber researcher, serves as the Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award Scientific Director. Candidates are invited to apply from Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center institutions (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Many studies have shown that physician-scientists leave academic research early in their careers for a number of reasons, including financial limitations and more opportunities in the private sector. Surmounting these formidable barriers to retention in academic research is critical to the future of Dana-Farber’s research enterprise and to the broader community of academic medical centers. The Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award is intended to create new avenues for early career physician-scientists to reach professional and financial stability within the field of academic research.

“We are deeply grateful to the Lubin family for their continued partnership with Dana-Farber, especially for their generous support of our world-class faculty. The innovative Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award sets an inspiring example for how we encourage physician-scientists and early career investigators to continue their promising research—by providing them with crucial mentoring and financial resources at a pivotal stage in their careers. These prestigious awards will not only help scientists in the field today, but also create a pipeline and support system for future talent who will someday drive the next major breakthroughs and change the landscape of cancer care as we know it,” said Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, President and CEO of Dana-Farber and the Richard and Susan Smith Professor of Medicine.

Lubin Scholars are among the most promising early career investigators who are pursuing cancer-relevant basic or translational laboratory-based research and who have demonstrated potential to become the next generation of leaders in cancer research. The selection of Lubin Scholars focuses primarily on those working in fundamental science because many of today’s most important advances in cancer can trace their origins back to research of the basic principles of biology and chemistry.

“I have tremendous admiration for Dana-Farber and respect for its commitment to training the future leaders who will shape the field of oncology. I am pleased that our Foundation has been able to work with the Institute to bring to fruition an award that will help the next generations of scientists succeed in their academic research careers,” said Richard Lubin.

“I know from experience that mentoring colleagues early in their careers has a positive impact on scientific research. Certainly, mentorship combined with a financial award will be incredibly beneficial to young scientists, and these new awards will assure that early career researchers can remain focused on their science and scientific training during their critical transition to independence,” said Kaelin. “I am grateful to the Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation for its vision and commitment in establishing these important and innovative awards.”

Lubin Scholars and Mentors

About the Award

The Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award was established by the Richard K. Lubin Family foundation in partnership with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The program supports early career physician-scientists in the greater Boston area as they launch their research careers. Lubin Scholars receive a four-year financial award of $150,000 per year and work under the tutelage of a Lubin Scholar Mentor to help guide them during this pivotal time in their early career. Up to four Lubin Scholars are selected annually. The purpose of the program is to help retain the brightest physician-scientists in academic research, through a combination of enhanced mentoring and financial support.

William G. Kaelin Jr., MD, a 2019 Nobel Prize recipient and Dana-Farber researcher, serves as the Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award Scientific Director. Candidates are invited to apply from Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center institutions (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Many studies have shown that physician-scientists leave academic research early in their careers for a number of reasons, including financial limitations and more opportunities in the private sector. Surmounting these formidable barriers to retention in academic research is critical to the future of Dana-Farber’s research enterprise and to the broader community of academic medical centers. The Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award is intended to create new avenues for early career physician-scientists to reach professional and financial stability within the field of academic research.

“We are deeply grateful to the Lubin family for their continued partnership with Dana-Farber, especially for their generous support of our world-class faculty. The innovative Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award sets an inspiring example for how we encourage physician-scientists and early career investigators to continue their promising research—by providing them with crucial mentoring and financial resources at a pivotal stage in their careers. These prestigious awards will not only help scientists in the field today, but also create a pipeline and support system for future talent who will someday drive the next major breakthroughs and change the landscape of cancer care as we know it,” said Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, President and CEO of Dana-Farber and the Richard and Susan Smith Professor of Medicine.

Lubin Scholars are among the most promising early career investigators who are pursuing cancer-relevant basic or translational laboratory-based research and who have demonstrated potential to become the next generation of leaders in cancer research. The selection of Lubin Scholars focuses primarily on those working in fundamental science because many of today’s most important advances in cancer can trace their origins back to research of the basic principles of biology and chemistry.

“I have tremendous admiration for Dana-Farber and respect for its commitment to training the future leaders who will shape the field of oncology. I am pleased that our Foundation has been able to work with the Institute to bring to fruition an award that will help the next generations of scientists succeed in their academic research careers,” said Richard Lubin.

“I know from experience that mentoring colleagues early in their careers has a positive impact on scientific research. Certainly, mentorship combined with a financial award will be incredibly beneficial to young scientists, and these new awards will assure that early career researchers can remain focused on their science and scientific training during their critical transition to independence,” said Kaelin. “I am grateful to the Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation for its vision and commitment in establishing these important and innovative awards.”

Lubin Scholars and Mentors

About the Award

The Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award was established by the Richard K. Lubin Family foundation in partnership with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The program supports early career physician-scientists in the greater Boston area as they launch their research careers. Lubin Scholars receive a four-year financial award of $150,000 per year and work under the tutelage of a Lubin Scholar Mentor to help guide them during this pivotal time in their early career. Up to four Lubin Scholars are selected annually. The purpose of the program is to help retain the brightest physician-scientists in academic research, through a combination of enhanced mentoring and financial support.

William G. Kaelin Jr., MD, a 2019 Nobel Prize recipient and Dana-Farber researcher, serves as the Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award Scientific Director. Candidates are invited to apply from Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center institutions (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Many studies have shown that physician-scientists leave academic research early in their careers for a number of reasons, including financial limitations and more opportunities in the private sector. Surmounting these formidable barriers to retention in academic research is critical to the future of Dana-Farber’s research enterprise and to the broader community of academic medical centers. The Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award is intended to create new avenues for early career physician-scientists to reach professional and financial stability within the field of academic research.

“We are deeply grateful to the Lubin family for their continued partnership with Dana-Farber, especially for their generous support of our world-class faculty. The innovative Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Award sets an inspiring example for how we encourage physician-scientists and early career investigators to continue their promising research—by providing them with crucial mentoring and financial resources at a pivotal stage in their careers. These prestigious awards will not only help scientists in the field today, but also create a pipeline and support system for future talent who will someday drive the next major breakthroughs and change the landscape of cancer care as we know it,” said Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, President and CEO of Dana-Farber and the Richard and Susan Smith Professor of Medicine.

Lubin Scholars are among the most promising early career investigators who are pursuing cancer-relevant basic or translational laboratory-based research and who have demonstrated potential to become the next generation of leaders in cancer research. The selection of Lubin Scholars focuses primarily on those working in fundamental science because many of today’s most important advances in cancer can trace their origins back to research of the basic principles of biology and chemistry.

“I have tremendous admiration for Dana-Farber and respect for its commitment to training the future leaders who will shape the field of oncology. I am pleased that our Foundation has been able to work with the Institute to bring to fruition an award that will help the next generations of scientists succeed in their academic research careers,” said Richard Lubin.

“I know from experience that mentoring colleagues early in their careers has a positive impact on scientific research. Certainly, mentorship combined with a financial award will be incredibly beneficial to young scientists, and these new awards will assure that early career researchers can remain focused on their science and scientific training during their critical transition to independence,” said Kaelin. “I am grateful to the Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation for its vision and commitment in establishing these important and innovative awards.”

Lubin Scholars and Mentors

Scholar Elliott Brea, MD, PhD, and Mentors Eric Smith and David Barbie, MD

Elliott Brea MD, PhD, is focused on developing new cellular therapies for lung cancer. Brea completed his MD and PhD degrees at Weill Cornell Medicine, and went on to complete his Internal Medicine residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is currently a fellow in the Dana-Farber/Mass General Brigham Hematology/Oncology program. With his mentors, Brea is working on developing and translating chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy in difficult-to-treat lung cancers. By focusing on identifying new targets as well as manipulating the tumor microenvironment, they are confident that they can translate their findings into the clinic.

Eric Smith, MD PhD, is Director of Translational Research for Immune Effector Cell Therapies at Dana-Farber; Principal Investigator of a pre-clinical laboratory; and Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School. He received his MD/PhD and internal medicine training at Mount Sinai School of Medicine/Hospital, and medical oncology and post-doctoral training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, where he stayed on as faculty in the Cellular Engineering Center and Myeloma/Cellular Therapy services before being recruited to Dana-Farber in 2020.

The Smith Lab for Gene and Cell Engineering focuses on advancing the field of gene, cellular, and mRNA immunotherapies for both hematologic and solid tumors, and translation of such therapies for the benefit of patients. An example of recent prior work includes the identification of GPRC5D as a target for the immunotherapy of myeloma, and generation and translation of the first GPRC5D-targeted CAR to the clinic (STM 2019; NEJM 2022).

David Barbie, MD, is a thoracic medical oncologist in the Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology, Dana-Farber; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; and Associate Director, Belfer Center for Applied Cancer Science. Barbie was Principal Investigator of a multicenter lung cancer clinical trial using this first-generation drug, and his work also led to similar studies in colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Currently, his laboratory is developing ways to co-opt TBK1 signaling to drive an antiviral response that can boost the impact of cancer immunotherapies. As a fellow, he was the recipient of an ASCO Young Investigator award and NIH K08 grant. Since starting his laboratory, he has also received an ASCI Young Physician Scientist Award, and was elected as an ASCI Member in 2019.

Scholar William Gibson, MD, PhD, and Mentor Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD

William Gibson, MD, PhD, earned degrees in Biological Engineering and Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He then joined the Harvard-MIT MD/PhD program, where he worked with Rameen Beroukhim on understanding cancer evolution and the therapeutic vulnerabilities of somatic copy number alterations. Gibson completed his residency in internal medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and is completing his Medical Oncology fellowship at Dana Farber. He performs research in the laboratories of Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, and Stuart Schreiber, PhD, where he is using emerging insights from chemical biology to address drug cancer's most intractable drivers, tumor suppressor genes.

Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, serves as Charles A. Dana Chair in Human Cancer Genetics at Dana-Farber; Professor of Genetics and Medicine at Harvard Medical School; and an Institute Member of the Cancer Program at the Broad Institute. Meyerson and colleagues have discovered genes and gene alterations important in human cancer, including the cyclin-dependent kinase genes CDK2 and CDK6, the telomerase catalytic subunit gene TERT, somatic mutations in lung cancer in EGFR (with Bill Sellers, MD, Bruce Johnson, MD, and Pasi Jänne, MD, PhD), BRAF, U2AF1, RBM10, HLA genes and others, and copy number alterations including lineage amplifications of NKX2-1 and SOX2 in lung cancers.

The current focus of the Meyerson Laboratory includes somatic alterations in the non-coding cancer genome, the cancer microbiome, and genome-inspired cancer drug discovery. Meyerson has been privileged to mentor a generation of young cancer scientists, among them many wonderful Dana-Farber oncology fellows.

Scholar Alexandria Maurer, MD, PhD, and Mentor Catherine Wu, MD

Alexandria Maurer, MD, PhD, grew up in Oklahoma, then attended the University of Rochester, where she did research in T-cell immunodeficiencies. She completed her MD/PhD training at the New York University Grossman School of Medicine in New York, NY, where she studied host defense mechanisms and infection. Maurer completed an Internal Medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, followed by medical oncology training at the Dana Farber/Mass General Brigham fellowship program, and she is currently an Instructor in Stem Cell Transplantation in Dana Farber's Department of Medical Oncology. Her current research centers on understanding how immune cells from a stem cell transplant donor can eradicate blood cancer cells in patients with leukemia.

Catherine Wu, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and Chief, Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapies, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians. Wu received her MD from Stanford University School of Medicine, and completed her clinical training in Internal Medicine and Hematology-Oncology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber. She joined the staff at Dana-Farber in 2000. At Dana-Farber, she has initiated an integrated program of research and clinical activities that focuses on dissecting the basis of effective anti-tumor immunity. Wu's laboratory has focused on the use of genomics-based approaches to discover immunogenic antigen targets, and to understand the molecular basis of therapeutic response and resistance. She has led early-phase clinical trials to test personalized tumor vaccines in melanoma and glioblastoma.

Scholar Elliott Brea, MD, PhD, and Mentors Eric Smith and David Barbie, MD

Elliott Brea MD, PhD, is focused on developing new cellular therapies for lung cancer. Brea completed his MD and PhD degrees at Weill Cornell Medicine, and went on to complete his Internal Medicine residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is currently a fellow in the Dana-Farber/Mass General Brigham Hematology/Oncology program. With his mentors, Brea is working on developing and translating chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy in difficult-to-treat lung cancers. By focusing on identifying new targets as well as manipulating the tumor microenvironment, they are confident that they can translate their findings into the clinic.

Eric Smith, MD PhD, is Director of Translational Research for Immune Effector Cell Therapies at Dana-Farber; Principal Investigator of a pre-clinical laboratory; and Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School. He received his MD/PhD and internal medicine training at Mount Sinai School of Medicine/Hospital, and medical oncology and post-doctoral training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, where he stayed on as faculty in the Cellular Engineering Center and Myeloma/Cellular Therapy services before being recruited to Dana-Farber in 2020.

The Smith Lab for Gene and Cell Engineering focuses on advancing the field of gene, cellular, and mRNA immunotherapies for both hematologic and solid tumors, and translation of such therapies for the benefit of patients. An example of recent prior work includes the identification of GPRC5D as a target for the immunotherapy of myeloma, and generation and translation of the first GPRC5D-targeted CAR to the clinic (STM 2019; NEJM 2022).

David Barbie, MD, is a thoracic medical oncologist in the Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology, Dana-Farber; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; and Associate Director, Belfer Center for Applied Cancer Science. Barbie was Principal Investigator of a multicenter lung cancer clinical trial using this first-generation drug, and his work also led to similar studies in colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Currently, his laboratory is developing ways to co-opt TBK1 signaling to drive an antiviral response that can boost the impact of cancer immunotherapies. As a fellow, he was the recipient of an ASCO Young Investigator award and NIH K08 grant. Since starting his laboratory, he has also received an ASCI Young Physician Scientist Award, and was elected as an ASCI Member in 2019.

Scholar William Gibson, MD, PhD, and Mentor Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD

William Gibson, MD, PhD, earned degrees in Biological Engineering and Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He then joined the Harvard-MIT MD/PhD program, where he worked with Rameen Beroukhim on understanding cancer evolution and the therapeutic vulnerabilities of somatic copy number alterations. Gibson completed his residency in internal medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and is completing his Medical Oncology fellowship at Dana Farber. He performs research in the laboratories of Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, and Stuart Schreiber, PhD, where he is using emerging insights from chemical biology to address drug cancer's most intractable drivers, tumor suppressor genes.

Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, serves as Charles A. Dana Chair in Human Cancer Genetics at Dana-Farber; Professor of Genetics and Medicine at Harvard Medical School; and an Institute Member of the Cancer Program at the Broad Institute. Meyerson and colleagues have discovered genes and gene alterations important in human cancer, including the cyclin-dependent kinase genes CDK2 and CDK6, the telomerase catalytic subunit gene TERT, somatic mutations in lung cancer in EGFR (with Bill Sellers, MD, Bruce Johnson, MD, and Pasi Jänne, MD, PhD), BRAF, U2AF1, RBM10, HLA genes and others, and copy number alterations including lineage amplifications of NKX2-1 and SOX2 in lung cancers.

The current focus of the Meyerson Laboratory includes somatic alterations in the non-coding cancer genome, the cancer microbiome, and genome-inspired cancer drug discovery. Meyerson has been privileged to mentor a generation of young cancer scientists, among them many wonderful Dana-Farber oncology fellows.

Scholar Alexandria Maurer, MD, PhD, and Mentor Catherine Wu, MD

Alexandria Maurer, MD, PhD, grew up in Oklahoma, then attended the University of Rochester, where she did research in T-cell immunodeficiencies. She completed her MD/PhD training at the New York University Grossman School of Medicine in New York, NY, where she studied host defense mechanisms and infection. Maurer completed an Internal Medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, followed by medical oncology training at the Dana Farber/Mass General Brigham fellowship program, and she is currently an Instructor in Stem Cell Transplantation in Dana Farber's Department of Medical Oncology. Her current research centers on understanding how immune cells from a stem cell transplant donor can eradicate blood cancer cells in patients with leukemia.

Catherine Wu, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and Chief, Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapies, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians. Wu received her MD from Stanford University School of Medicine, and completed her clinical training in Internal Medicine and Hematology-Oncology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber. She joined the staff at Dana-Farber in 2000. At Dana-Farber, she has initiated an integrated program of research and clinical activities that focuses on dissecting the basis of effective anti-tumor immunity. Wu's laboratory has focused on the use of genomics-based approaches to discover immunogenic antigen targets, and to understand the molecular basis of therapeutic response and resistance. She has led early-phase clinical trials to test personalized tumor vaccines in melanoma and glioblastoma.

Scholar Elliott Brea, MD, PhD, and Mentors Eric Smith and David Barbie, MD

Elliott Brea MD, PhD, is focused on developing new cellular therapies for lung cancer. Brea completed his MD and PhD degrees at Weill Cornell Medicine, and went on to complete his Internal Medicine residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is currently a fellow in the Dana-Farber/Mass General Brigham Hematology/Oncology program. With his mentors, Brea is working on developing and translating chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy in difficult-to-treat lung cancers. By focusing on identifying new targets as well as manipulating the tumor microenvironment, they are confident that they can translate their findings into the clinic.

Eric Smith, MD PhD, is Director of Translational Research for Immune Effector Cell Therapies at Dana-Farber; Principal Investigator of a pre-clinical laboratory; and Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School. He received his MD/PhD and internal medicine training at Mount Sinai School of Medicine/Hospital, and medical oncology and post-doctoral training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, where he stayed on as faculty in the Cellular Engineering Center and Myeloma/Cellular Therapy services before being recruited to Dana-Farber in 2020.

The Smith Lab for Gene and Cell Engineering focuses on advancing the field of gene, cellular, and mRNA immunotherapies for both hematologic and solid tumors, and translation of such therapies for the benefit of patients. An example of recent prior work includes the identification of GPRC5D as a target for the immunotherapy of myeloma, and generation and translation of the first GPRC5D-targeted CAR to the clinic (STM 2019; NEJM 2022).

David Barbie, MD, is a thoracic medical oncologist in the Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology, Dana-Farber; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; and Associate Director, Belfer Center for Applied Cancer Science. Barbie was Principal Investigator of a multicenter lung cancer clinical trial using this first-generation drug, and his work also led to similar studies in colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Currently, his laboratory is developing ways to co-opt TBK1 signaling to drive an antiviral response that can boost the impact of cancer immunotherapies. As a fellow, he was the recipient of an ASCO Young Investigator award and NIH K08 grant. Since starting his laboratory, he has also received an ASCI Young Physician Scientist Award, and was elected as an ASCI Member in 2019.

Scholar William Gibson, MD, PhD, and Mentor Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD

William Gibson, MD, PhD, earned degrees in Biological Engineering and Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He then joined the Harvard-MIT MD/PhD program, where he worked with Rameen Beroukhim on understanding cancer evolution and the therapeutic vulnerabilities of somatic copy number alterations. Gibson completed his residency in internal medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and is completing his Medical Oncology fellowship at Dana Farber. He performs research in the laboratories of Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, and Stuart Schreiber, PhD, where he is using emerging insights from chemical biology to address drug cancer's most intractable drivers, tumor suppressor genes.

Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, serves as Charles A. Dana Chair in Human Cancer Genetics at Dana-Farber; Professor of Genetics and Medicine at Harvard Medical School; and an Institute Member of the Cancer Program at the Broad Institute. Meyerson and colleagues have discovered genes and gene alterations important in human cancer, including the cyclin-dependent kinase genes CDK2 and CDK6, the telomerase catalytic subunit gene TERT, somatic mutations in lung cancer in EGFR (with Bill Sellers, MD, Bruce Johnson, MD, and Pasi Jänne, MD, PhD), BRAF, U2AF1, RBM10, HLA genes and others, and copy number alterations including lineage amplifications of NKX2-1 and SOX2 in lung cancers.

The current focus of the Meyerson Laboratory includes somatic alterations in the non-coding cancer genome, the cancer microbiome, and genome-inspired cancer drug discovery. Meyerson has been privileged to mentor a generation of young cancer scientists, among them many wonderful Dana-Farber oncology fellows.

Scholar Alexandria Maurer, MD, PhD, and Mentor Catherine Wu, MD

Alexandria Maurer, MD, PhD, grew up in Oklahoma, then attended the University of Rochester, where she did research in T-cell immunodeficiencies. She completed her MD/PhD training at the New York University Grossman School of Medicine in New York, NY, where she studied host defense mechanisms and infection. Maurer completed an Internal Medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, followed by medical oncology training at the Dana Farber/Mass General Brigham fellowship program, and she is currently an Instructor in Stem Cell Transplantation in Dana Farber's Department of Medical Oncology. Her current research centers on understanding how immune cells from a stem cell transplant donor can eradicate blood cancer cells in patients with leukemia.

Catherine Wu, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and Chief, Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapies, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians. Wu received her MD from Stanford University School of Medicine, and completed her clinical training in Internal Medicine and Hematology-Oncology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber. She joined the staff at Dana-Farber in 2000. At Dana-Farber, she has initiated an integrated program of research and clinical activities that focuses on dissecting the basis of effective anti-tumor immunity. Wu's laboratory has focused on the use of genomics-based approaches to discover immunogenic antigen targets, and to understand the molecular basis of therapeutic response and resistance. She has led early-phase clinical trials to test personalized tumor vaccines in melanoma and glioblastoma.

Scholar Elliott Brea, MD, PhD, and Mentors Eric Smith and David Barbie, MD

Elliott Brea MD, PhD, is focused on developing new cellular therapies for lung cancer. Brea completed his MD and PhD degrees at Weill Cornell Medicine, and went on to complete his Internal Medicine residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is currently a fellow in the Dana-Farber/Mass General Brigham Hematology/Oncology program. With his mentors, Brea is working on developing and translating chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy in difficult-to-treat lung cancers. By focusing on identifying new targets as well as manipulating the tumor microenvironment, they are confident that they can translate their findings into the clinic.

Eric Smith, MD PhD, is Director of Translational Research for Immune Effector Cell Therapies at Dana-Farber; Principal Investigator of a pre-clinical laboratory; and Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School. He received his MD/PhD and internal medicine training at Mount Sinai School of Medicine/Hospital, and medical oncology and post-doctoral training at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, where he stayed on as faculty in the Cellular Engineering Center and Myeloma/Cellular Therapy services before being recruited to Dana-Farber in 2020.

The Smith Lab for Gene and Cell Engineering focuses on advancing the field of gene, cellular, and mRNA immunotherapies for both hematologic and solid tumors, and translation of such therapies for the benefit of patients. An example of recent prior work includes the identification of GPRC5D as a target for the immunotherapy of myeloma, and generation and translation of the first GPRC5D-targeted CAR to the clinic (STM 2019; NEJM 2022).

David Barbie, MD, is a thoracic medical oncologist in the Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology, Dana-Farber; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; and Associate Director, Belfer Center for Applied Cancer Science. Barbie was Principal Investigator of a multicenter lung cancer clinical trial using this first-generation drug, and his work also led to similar studies in colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Currently, his laboratory is developing ways to co-opt TBK1 signaling to drive an antiviral response that can boost the impact of cancer immunotherapies. As a fellow, he was the recipient of an ASCO Young Investigator award and NIH K08 grant. Since starting his laboratory, he has also received an ASCI Young Physician Scientist Award, and was elected as an ASCI Member in 2019.

Scholar William Gibson, MD, PhD, and Mentor Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD

William Gibson, MD, PhD, earned degrees in Biological Engineering and Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He then joined the Harvard-MIT MD/PhD program, where he worked with Rameen Beroukhim on understanding cancer evolution and the therapeutic vulnerabilities of somatic copy number alterations. Gibson completed his residency in internal medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and is completing his Medical Oncology fellowship at Dana Farber. He performs research in the laboratories of Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, and Stuart Schreiber, PhD, where he is using emerging insights from chemical biology to address drug cancer's most intractable drivers, tumor suppressor genes.

Matthew Meyerson, MD, PhD, serves as Charles A. Dana Chair in Human Cancer Genetics at Dana-Farber; Professor of Genetics and Medicine at Harvard Medical School; and an Institute Member of the Cancer Program at the Broad Institute. Meyerson and colleagues have discovered genes and gene alterations important in human cancer, including the cyclin-dependent kinase genes CDK2 and CDK6, the telomerase catalytic subunit gene TERT, somatic mutations in lung cancer in EGFR (with Bill Sellers, MD, Bruce Johnson, MD, and Pasi Jänne, MD, PhD), BRAF, U2AF1, RBM10, HLA genes and others, and copy number alterations including lineage amplifications of NKX2-1 and SOX2 in lung cancers.

The current focus of the Meyerson Laboratory includes somatic alterations in the non-coding cancer genome, the cancer microbiome, and genome-inspired cancer drug discovery. Meyerson has been privileged to mentor a generation of young cancer scientists, among them many wonderful Dana-Farber oncology fellows.

Scholar Alexandria Maurer, MD, PhD, and Mentor Catherine Wu, MD

Alexandria Maurer, MD, PhD, grew up in Oklahoma, then attended the University of Rochester, where she did research in T-cell immunodeficiencies. She completed her MD/PhD training at the New York University Grossman School of Medicine in New York, NY, where she studied host defense mechanisms and infection. Maurer completed an Internal Medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, followed by medical oncology training at the Dana Farber/Mass General Brigham fellowship program, and she is currently an Instructor in Stem Cell Transplantation in Dana Farber's Department of Medical Oncology. Her current research centers on understanding how immune cells from a stem cell transplant donor can eradicate blood cancer cells in patients with leukemia.

Catherine Wu, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and Chief, Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapies, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians. Wu received her MD from Stanford University School of Medicine, and completed her clinical training in Internal Medicine and Hematology-Oncology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber. She joined the staff at Dana-Farber in 2000. At Dana-Farber, she has initiated an integrated program of research and clinical activities that focuses on dissecting the basis of effective anti-tumor immunity. Wu's laboratory has focused on the use of genomics-based approaches to discover immunogenic antigen targets, and to understand the molecular basis of therapeutic response and resistance. She has led early-phase clinical trials to test personalized tumor vaccines in melanoma and glioblastoma.

Scholar Justin Becker, MD, PhD, and Mentor Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD

Justin Becker, MD, PhD, is a physician-scientist in the hematology/oncology fellowship of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital. Becker completed his MD and PhD degrees at the University of Pennsylvania, followed by a residency in internal medicine at Mass General. As a fellow, he takes care of patients with lung cancer at Mass General and conducts laboratory research at Dana-Farber under the mentorship of Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD. Becker's research focuses on particular stretches of the human genome, derived from viruses, that may play a critical role in how the immune system fights cancer. He hopes that his work may inform the development of a new class of therapies for melanoma, lung cancer, and other malignancies.

Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD, is Chair of Cancer Biology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where he holds the Richard and Nancy Lubin Family Chair. He is also Director of the Gene Regulation Observatory at the Broad Institute, a Professor of Cell Biology and Pathology at Harvard Medical School, and an Investigator in Harvard's Ludwig Institute. He served on the faculty at Massachusetts General Hospital from 2005 to 2021.

Bernstein's research focuses on epigenetic gene regulation in stem cells and cancer. His work has been recognized by an Early Career Scientist Award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the NIH Director's Pioneer Award, an American Cancer Society Professorship, and the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research.

Scholar Cynthia Hahn, MD, PhD, and Mentor Catherine Wu, MD

Cynthia Hahn, MD, PhD, grew up in the small town of Mahomet, Illinois, then came east to attend Amherst College, where she majored in chemistry. She discovered a passion for scientific research and spent three years after graduation working in cancer genomics at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute. She then completed her MD-PhD training at Dartmouth Medical School, studying post-transcriptional mechanisms of fetal hemoglobin induction in β-hemoglobinopathies. Hahn returned to Boston to complete her internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital and is now a Dana-Farber/Mass General Brigham Hematology/Oncology Fellow, specializing in lymphoma. Her current research spans cancer genomics and immunology, focusing on elucidating mechanisms of immune evasion in B-cell malignancies.

Catherine J. Wu, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and Chief, Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapies at Dana-Farber. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians. Wu received her MD from Stanford University School of Medicine and completed her clinical training in Internal Medicine and Hematology/Oncology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Wu joined the Dana-Farber staff in 2000. At Dana-Farber, she has initiated an integrated program of research and clinical activities that focuses on dissecting the basis of effective anti-tumor immunity. Her laboratory has focused on the use of genomics-based approaches to discover immunogenic antigen targets and to understand the molecular basis of therapeutic response and resistance. She has led early-phase clinical trials to test personalized tumor vaccines in melanoma and glioblastoma.

Scholar Diana Shi, MD, and Mentors William Kaelin Jr., MD, and Daphne Haas-Kogan, MD, MBA

Diana Shi, MD, was born and raised in Morgantown, West Virginia. She attended Princeton University, where her research focused on chemical synthesis of light-sensitive “caged” neurotransmitters. Shi went on to attend Harvard Medical School, where she joined the laboratory of William G. Kaelin Jr., at Dana-Farber as a medical student during a year-long Howard Hughes Medical Research Fellowship. This experience solidified her interest in oncology and led her to pursue clinical training in radiation oncology. Following medical school graduation in 2018, Shi completed a medicine internship at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and she is currently a resident in the Research track of the Harvard Radiation Oncology Program.

William G. Kaelin Jr., MD, is the 2019 Nobel Prize recipient in Medicine or Physiology. He received his MD from Duke University in 1982 and was a house officer and chief resident in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Kaelin was a Medical Oncology Clinical Fellow at Dana-Farber and a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of David Livingston, MD, where he began his studies of tumor suppressor proteins. He became an independent investigator at Dana-Farber in 1992, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in 2002. The 2019 Nobel was awarded jointly to Kaelin, Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability.

Daphne Haas-Kogan, MD, MBA, is Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Boston Children's Hospital. She is the Willem and Corrie Hees Family Professor of Radiation Oncology at Harvard Medical School. Haas-Kogan received her undergraduate degree in biochemistry and molecular biology magna cum laude from Harvard University and her MD from the University of California, San Francisco, where she was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society. She completed her residency in radiation oncology and post-doctoral fellowship in molecular neuro-oncology at UCSF in 1997.

While in medical school, Haas-Kogan received the Henry J. Kaiser Award for Excellence in Teaching at the UCSF School of Medicine, and was nominated for the UCSF Teaching Award for students and trainees. Her dedication to education and mentorship continued as she served at UCSF as Residency Director for eight years and Vice-Chair for Research and Education for nine years. Most recently, Haas-Kogan was awarded the highest mentorship recognition at Dana-Farber as the 2021 recipient of the Edward J. Benz Jr., Award for Advancing the Careers of Women Faculty.

Scholar Jonathan Tsai, MD, PhD, and Mentor Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD

Jonathan Tsai, MD, PhD, completed his undergraduate at the California Institute of Technology, where he worked in the laboratory of David Baltimore, PhD, on T-cell receptor biology. He was a Fulbright Scholar at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, before receiving his MD and PhD from Stanford University. At Stanford, Tsai worked with Irving Weissman, MD, to characterize tissue-specific stem cells and their contributions to fibrosis and regeneration. Tsai completed his Clinical Pathology residency and Molecular Genetics Pathology fellowship at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is currently a post-doctoral researcher at Dana Farber in the laboratory of Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD, where he is investigating degradation pathways governing nuclear hormone receptors.

Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD, is Chair of Medical Oncology at Dana-Farber, the George P. Canellos, MD, and Jean S. Canellos Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and an Institute Member of the Broad Institute. The Ebert Laboratory focuses on the biology and therapy of hematologic malignancies. The laboratory has elucidated multiple novel mechanisms of targeted protein degradation, beginning with the mechanism of action lenalidomide, a derivative of thalidomide. Additional work has focused on the biology and genetics of myeloid malignancies, including the characterization of clonal hematopoiesis, a pre-malignant state for blood cancers.

Scholar Justin Becker, MD, PhD, and Mentor Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD

Justin Becker, MD, PhD, is a physician-scientist in the hematology/oncology fellowship of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital. Becker completed his MD and PhD degrees at the University of Pennsylvania, followed by a residency in internal medicine at Mass General. As a fellow, he takes care of patients with lung cancer at Mass General and conducts laboratory research at Dana-Farber under the mentorship of Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD. Becker's research focuses on particular stretches of the human genome, derived from viruses, that may play a critical role in how the immune system fights cancer. He hopes that his work may inform the development of a new class of therapies for melanoma, lung cancer, and other malignancies.

Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD, is Chair of Cancer Biology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where he holds the Richard and Nancy Lubin Family Chair. He is also Director of the Gene Regulation Observatory at the Broad Institute, a Professor of Cell Biology and Pathology at Harvard Medical School, and an Investigator in Harvard's Ludwig Institute. He served on the faculty at Massachusetts General Hospital from 2005 to 2021.

Bernstein's research focuses on epigenetic gene regulation in stem cells and cancer. His work has been recognized by an Early Career Scientist Award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the NIH Director's Pioneer Award, an American Cancer Society Professorship, and the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research.

Scholar Cynthia Hahn, MD, PhD, and Mentor Catherine Wu, MD

Cynthia Hahn, MD, PhD, grew up in the small town of Mahomet, Illinois, then came east to attend Amherst College, where she majored in chemistry. She discovered a passion for scientific research and spent three years after graduation working in cancer genomics at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute. She then completed her MD-PhD training at Dartmouth Medical School, studying post-transcriptional mechanisms of fetal hemoglobin induction in β-hemoglobinopathies. Hahn returned to Boston to complete her internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital and is now a Dana-Farber/Mass General Brigham Hematology/Oncology Fellow, specializing in lymphoma. Her current research spans cancer genomics and immunology, focusing on elucidating mechanisms of immune evasion in B-cell malignancies.

Catherine J. Wu, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and Chief, Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapies at Dana-Farber. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians. Wu received her MD from Stanford University School of Medicine and completed her clinical training in Internal Medicine and Hematology/Oncology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Wu joined the Dana-Farber staff in 2000. At Dana-Farber, she has initiated an integrated program of research and clinical activities that focuses on dissecting the basis of effective anti-tumor immunity. Her laboratory has focused on the use of genomics-based approaches to discover immunogenic antigen targets and to understand the molecular basis of therapeutic response and resistance. She has led early-phase clinical trials to test personalized tumor vaccines in melanoma and glioblastoma.

Scholar Diana Shi, MD, and Mentors William Kaelin Jr., MD, and Daphne Haas-Kogan, MD, MBA

Diana Shi, MD, was born and raised in Morgantown, West Virginia. She attended Princeton University, where her research focused on chemical synthesis of light-sensitive “caged” neurotransmitters. Shi went on to attend Harvard Medical School, where she joined the laboratory of William G. Kaelin Jr., at Dana-Farber as a medical student during a year-long Howard Hughes Medical Research Fellowship. This experience solidified her interest in oncology and led her to pursue clinical training in radiation oncology. Following medical school graduation in 2018, Shi completed a medicine internship at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and she is currently a resident in the Research track of the Harvard Radiation Oncology Program.

William G. Kaelin Jr., MD, is the 2019 Nobel Prize recipient in Medicine or Physiology. He received his MD from Duke University in 1982 and was a house officer and chief resident in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Kaelin was a Medical Oncology Clinical Fellow at Dana-Farber and a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of David Livingston, MD, where he began his studies of tumor suppressor proteins. He became an independent investigator at Dana-Farber in 1992, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in 2002. The 2019 Nobel was awarded jointly to Kaelin, Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability.

Daphne Haas-Kogan, MD, MBA, is Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Boston Children's Hospital. She is the Willem and Corrie Hees Family Professor of Radiation Oncology at Harvard Medical School. Haas-Kogan received her undergraduate degree in biochemistry and molecular biology magna cum laude from Harvard University and her MD from the University of California, San Francisco, where she was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society. She completed her residency in radiation oncology and post-doctoral fellowship in molecular neuro-oncology at UCSF in 1997.

While in medical school, Haas-Kogan received the Henry J. Kaiser Award for Excellence in Teaching at the UCSF School of Medicine, and was nominated for the UCSF Teaching Award for students and trainees. Her dedication to education and mentorship continued as she served at UCSF as Residency Director for eight years and Vice-Chair for Research and Education for nine years. Most recently, Haas-Kogan was awarded the highest mentorship recognition at Dana-Farber as the 2021 recipient of the Edward J. Benz Jr., Award for Advancing the Careers of Women Faculty.

Scholar Jonathan Tsai, MD, PhD, and Mentor Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD

Jonathan Tsai, MD, PhD, completed his undergraduate at the California Institute of Technology, where he worked in the laboratory of David Baltimore, PhD, on T-cell receptor biology. He was a Fulbright Scholar at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, before receiving his MD and PhD from Stanford University. At Stanford, Tsai worked with Irving Weissman, MD, to characterize tissue-specific stem cells and their contributions to fibrosis and regeneration. Tsai completed his Clinical Pathology residency and Molecular Genetics Pathology fellowship at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is currently a post-doctoral researcher at Dana Farber in the laboratory of Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD, where he is investigating degradation pathways governing nuclear hormone receptors.

Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD, is Chair of Medical Oncology at Dana-Farber, the George P. Canellos, MD, and Jean S. Canellos Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and an Institute Member of the Broad Institute. The Ebert Laboratory focuses on the biology and therapy of hematologic malignancies. The laboratory has elucidated multiple novel mechanisms of targeted protein degradation, beginning with the mechanism of action lenalidomide, a derivative of thalidomide. Additional work has focused on the biology and genetics of myeloid malignancies, including the characterization of clonal hematopoiesis, a pre-malignant state for blood cancers.

Scholar Justin Becker, MD, PhD, and Mentor Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD

Justin Becker, MD, PhD, is a physician-scientist in the hematology/oncology fellowship of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital. Becker completed his MD and PhD degrees at the University of Pennsylvania, followed by a residency in internal medicine at Mass General. As a fellow, he takes care of patients with lung cancer at Mass General and conducts laboratory research at Dana-Farber under the mentorship of Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD. Becker's research focuses on particular stretches of the human genome, derived from viruses, that may play a critical role in how the immune system fights cancer. He hopes that his work may inform the development of a new class of therapies for melanoma, lung cancer, and other malignancies.

Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD, is Chair of Cancer Biology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where he holds the Richard and Nancy Lubin Family Chair. He is also Director of the Gene Regulation Observatory at the Broad Institute, a Professor of Cell Biology and Pathology at Harvard Medical School, and an Investigator in Harvard's Ludwig Institute. He served on the faculty at Massachusetts General Hospital from 2005 to 2021.

Bernstein's research focuses on epigenetic gene regulation in stem cells and cancer. His work has been recognized by an Early Career Scientist Award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the NIH Director's Pioneer Award, an American Cancer Society Professorship, and the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research.

Scholar Cynthia Hahn, MD, PhD, and Mentor Catherine Wu, MD

Cynthia Hahn, MD, PhD, grew up in the small town of Mahomet, Illinois, then came east to attend Amherst College, where she majored in chemistry. She discovered a passion for scientific research and spent three years after graduation working in cancer genomics at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute. She then completed her MD-PhD training at Dartmouth Medical School, studying post-transcriptional mechanisms of fetal hemoglobin induction in β-hemoglobinopathies. Hahn returned to Boston to complete her internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital and is now a Dana-Farber/Mass General Brigham Hematology/Oncology Fellow, specializing in lymphoma. Her current research spans cancer genomics and immunology, focusing on elucidating mechanisms of immune evasion in B-cell malignancies.

Catherine J. Wu, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and Chief, Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapies at Dana-Farber. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians. Wu received her MD from Stanford University School of Medicine and completed her clinical training in Internal Medicine and Hematology/Oncology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Wu joined the Dana-Farber staff in 2000. At Dana-Farber, she has initiated an integrated program of research and clinical activities that focuses on dissecting the basis of effective anti-tumor immunity. Her laboratory has focused on the use of genomics-based approaches to discover immunogenic antigen targets and to understand the molecular basis of therapeutic response and resistance. She has led early-phase clinical trials to test personalized tumor vaccines in melanoma and glioblastoma.

Scholar Diana Shi, MD, and Mentors William Kaelin Jr., MD, and Daphne Haas-Kogan, MD, MBA

Diana Shi, MD, was born and raised in Morgantown, West Virginia. She attended Princeton University, where her research focused on chemical synthesis of light-sensitive “caged” neurotransmitters. Shi went on to attend Harvard Medical School, where she joined the laboratory of William G. Kaelin Jr., at Dana-Farber as a medical student during a year-long Howard Hughes Medical Research Fellowship. This experience solidified her interest in oncology and led her to pursue clinical training in radiation oncology. Following medical school graduation in 2018, Shi completed a medicine internship at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and she is currently a resident in the Research track of the Harvard Radiation Oncology Program.

William G. Kaelin Jr., MD, is the 2019 Nobel Prize recipient in Medicine or Physiology. He received his MD from Duke University in 1982 and was a house officer and chief resident in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Kaelin was a Medical Oncology Clinical Fellow at Dana-Farber and a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of David Livingston, MD, where he began his studies of tumor suppressor proteins. He became an independent investigator at Dana-Farber in 1992, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in 2002. The 2019 Nobel was awarded jointly to Kaelin, Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability.

Daphne Haas-Kogan, MD, MBA, is Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Boston Children's Hospital. She is the Willem and Corrie Hees Family Professor of Radiation Oncology at Harvard Medical School. Haas-Kogan received her undergraduate degree in biochemistry and molecular biology magna cum laude from Harvard University and her MD from the University of California, San Francisco, where she was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society. She completed her residency in radiation oncology and post-doctoral fellowship in molecular neuro-oncology at UCSF in 1997.

While in medical school, Haas-Kogan received the Henry J. Kaiser Award for Excellence in Teaching at the UCSF School of Medicine, and was nominated for the UCSF Teaching Award for students and trainees. Her dedication to education and mentorship continued as she served at UCSF as Residency Director for eight years and Vice-Chair for Research and Education for nine years. Most recently, Haas-Kogan was awarded the highest mentorship recognition at Dana-Farber as the 2021 recipient of the Edward J. Benz Jr., Award for Advancing the Careers of Women Faculty.

Scholar Jonathan Tsai, MD, PhD, and Mentor Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD

Jonathan Tsai, MD, PhD, completed his undergraduate at the California Institute of Technology, where he worked in the laboratory of David Baltimore, PhD, on T-cell receptor biology. He was a Fulbright Scholar at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, before receiving his MD and PhD from Stanford University. At Stanford, Tsai worked with Irving Weissman, MD, to characterize tissue-specific stem cells and their contributions to fibrosis and regeneration. Tsai completed his Clinical Pathology residency and Molecular Genetics Pathology fellowship at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is currently a post-doctoral researcher at Dana Farber in the laboratory of Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD, where he is investigating degradation pathways governing nuclear hormone receptors.

Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD, is Chair of Medical Oncology at Dana-Farber, the George P. Canellos, MD, and Jean S. Canellos Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and an Institute Member of the Broad Institute. The Ebert Laboratory focuses on the biology and therapy of hematologic malignancies. The laboratory has elucidated multiple novel mechanisms of targeted protein degradation, beginning with the mechanism of action lenalidomide, a derivative of thalidomide. Additional work has focused on the biology and genetics of myeloid malignancies, including the characterization of clonal hematopoiesis, a pre-malignant state for blood cancers.

Scholar Justin Becker, MD, PhD, and Mentor Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD

Justin Becker, MD, PhD, is a physician-scientist in the hematology/oncology fellowship of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital. Becker completed his MD and PhD degrees at the University of Pennsylvania, followed by a residency in internal medicine at Mass General. As a fellow, he takes care of patients with lung cancer at Mass General and conducts laboratory research at Dana-Farber under the mentorship of Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD. Becker's research focuses on particular stretches of the human genome, derived from viruses, that may play a critical role in how the immune system fights cancer. He hopes that his work may inform the development of a new class of therapies for melanoma, lung cancer, and other malignancies.

Bradley Bernstein, MD, PhD, is Chair of Cancer Biology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, where he holds the Richard and Nancy Lubin Family Chair. He is also Director of the Gene Regulation Observatory at the Broad Institute, a Professor of Cell Biology and Pathology at Harvard Medical School, and an Investigator in Harvard's Ludwig Institute. He served on the faculty at Massachusetts General Hospital from 2005 to 2021.

Bernstein's research focuses on epigenetic gene regulation in stem cells and cancer. His work has been recognized by an Early Career Scientist Award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the NIH Director's Pioneer Award, an American Cancer Society Professorship, and the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research.

Scholar Cynthia Hahn, MD, PhD, and Mentor Catherine Wu, MD

Cynthia Hahn, MD, PhD, grew up in the small town of Mahomet, Illinois, then came east to attend Amherst College, where she majored in chemistry. She discovered a passion for scientific research and spent three years after graduation working in cancer genomics at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute. She then completed her MD-PhD training at Dartmouth Medical School, studying post-transcriptional mechanisms of fetal hemoglobin induction in β-hemoglobinopathies. Hahn returned to Boston to complete her internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital and is now a Dana-Farber/Mass General Brigham Hematology/Oncology Fellow, specializing in lymphoma. Her current research spans cancer genomics and immunology, focusing on elucidating mechanisms of immune evasion in B-cell malignancies.

Catherine J. Wu, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and Chief, Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapies at Dana-Farber. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians. Wu received her MD from Stanford University School of Medicine and completed her clinical training in Internal Medicine and Hematology/Oncology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Wu joined the Dana-Farber staff in 2000. At Dana-Farber, she has initiated an integrated program of research and clinical activities that focuses on dissecting the basis of effective anti-tumor immunity. Her laboratory has focused on the use of genomics-based approaches to discover immunogenic antigen targets and to understand the molecular basis of therapeutic response and resistance. She has led early-phase clinical trials to test personalized tumor vaccines in melanoma and glioblastoma.

Scholar Diana Shi, MD, and Mentors William Kaelin Jr., MD, and Daphne Haas-Kogan, MD, MBA

Diana Shi, MD, was born and raised in Morgantown, West Virginia. She attended Princeton University, where her research focused on chemical synthesis of light-sensitive “caged” neurotransmitters. Shi went on to attend Harvard Medical School, where she joined the laboratory of William G. Kaelin Jr., at Dana-Farber as a medical student during a year-long Howard Hughes Medical Research Fellowship. This experience solidified her interest in oncology and led her to pursue clinical training in radiation oncology. Following medical school graduation in 2018, Shi completed a medicine internship at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and she is currently a resident in the Research track of the Harvard Radiation Oncology Program.

William G. Kaelin Jr., MD, is the 2019 Nobel Prize recipient in Medicine or Physiology. He received his MD from Duke University in 1982 and was a house officer and chief resident in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Kaelin was a Medical Oncology Clinical Fellow at Dana-Farber and a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of David Livingston, MD, where he began his studies of tumor suppressor proteins. He became an independent investigator at Dana-Farber in 1992, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in 2002. The 2019 Nobel was awarded jointly to Kaelin, Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability.

Daphne Haas-Kogan, MD, MBA, is Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Boston Children's Hospital. She is the Willem and Corrie Hees Family Professor of Radiation Oncology at Harvard Medical School. Haas-Kogan received her undergraduate degree in biochemistry and molecular biology magna cum laude from Harvard University and her MD from the University of California, San Francisco, where she was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society. She completed her residency in radiation oncology and post-doctoral fellowship in molecular neuro-oncology at UCSF in 1997.

While in medical school, Haas-Kogan received the Henry J. Kaiser Award for Excellence in Teaching at the UCSF School of Medicine, and was nominated for the UCSF Teaching Award for students and trainees. Her dedication to education and mentorship continued as she served at UCSF as Residency Director for eight years and Vice-Chair for Research and Education for nine years. Most recently, Haas-Kogan was awarded the highest mentorship recognition at Dana-Farber as the 2021 recipient of the Edward J. Benz Jr., Award for Advancing the Careers of Women Faculty.

Scholar Jonathan Tsai, MD, PhD, and Mentor Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD

Jonathan Tsai, MD, PhD, completed his undergraduate at the California Institute of Technology, where he worked in the laboratory of David Baltimore, PhD, on T-cell receptor biology. He was a Fulbright Scholar at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, before receiving his MD and PhD from Stanford University. At Stanford, Tsai worked with Irving Weissman, MD, to characterize tissue-specific stem cells and their contributions to fibrosis and regeneration. Tsai completed his Clinical Pathology residency and Molecular Genetics Pathology fellowship at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He is currently a post-doctoral researcher at Dana Farber in the laboratory of Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD, where he is investigating degradation pathways governing nuclear hormone receptors.

Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD, is Chair of Medical Oncology at Dana-Farber, the George P. Canellos, MD, and Jean S. Canellos Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, and an Institute Member of the Broad Institute. The Ebert Laboratory focuses on the biology and therapy of hematologic malignancies. The laboratory has elucidated multiple novel mechanisms of targeted protein degradation, beginning with the mechanism of action lenalidomide, a derivative of thalidomide. Additional work has focused on the biology and genetics of myeloid malignancies, including the characterization of clonal hematopoiesis, a pre-malignant state for blood cancers.